Chitimukulu is trying to use Lozis and Barotseland to acquire some constitutional recognition through bill 10 - Zambian Canadian lawyer

20 February 2020
Author 
CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE!

Zambian born Canadian Lawyer, Elias Munshya, has taken a swipe at Chitimukulu Kanyanta-Manga II for proposing that the current Constitutional (Amendment) Bill 2019, Bill 10, includes a new clause that will create a Council for Paramount Chiefs in the Republican Constitution comprising the Litunga, King of Barotseland, Kalonga Gawa Undi, Nkosi yama Nkosi Mpezeni and Mwinelubemba Chitimukulu Kanyanta-Manga II of the Bemba.

To achieve his proposal, Kanyanta Sosala, the Chitimukulu (Paramount Chief of the Bemba) has challenged the opposition UPND parliamentarians who hail from Barotseland in the Western Province of Zambia to vote for the controversial and disgraced bill so that their King, the Litunga, would supposedly be accorded his venerated position in the constitution of the Republic along with his Zambian counterparts, the named Paramount Chiefs.

However, Elias Munshya has accused the Chitimukulu of deceitfully riding on the Lozi people and the emotive issue of Barotseland to create for himself a constitutional status never before accorded to any Chitimukulu in the entire history of Zambia.

While Mr Munshya agrees that the Litunga and the people of Barotseland may legitimately have a right to demand such special rights and recognition in the republican constitution, he has, however, argued that the Bemba paramount chief has no such inherent claim and is now trying to use the Litunga and the people of Barotseland to acquire for himself a new constitutional status he has never personally had nor any Chitimukulu before him.

“…This is so unfair that Chitimukulu is the one who is going to advise the UPND MPs to vote for Bill 10 so that they can then push in this extra amendment that is going to create the Council of Paramount Chiefs… Chitimukulu must take it easy and stop provoking the people of Western province in this manner,” complained Munshya.

“On the other hand” Munshya continues, “Barotseland does have some constitutional justification to demand something better out of the constitution of Zambia. Right? But Chitimukulu cannot insert himself into that conversation because Chitimukulu has no agreement either with Zambia to create a new nation! There is no agreement! There is no history! Chitimukulu has no justifiable history why he should be inserting himself into the issue of Barotseland.”

Mr Munshya further rebuffed the Chitimukulu’s idea that the creation of the Council of Paramount Chiefs in the constitution would help Barotseland.

The creation of the Paramount Chiefs’ council, he said, would not at all help Barotseland, and therefore, it was unfair that the Chitimukulu of the Bemba was inserting himself in the issues of Barotseland.

Mr Munshya said that if the people of Barotseland wanted to negotiate for themselves a constitutional status within a united Zambia, it was up to the people of Barotseland to do so.

“Chitimukulu should not be blackmailing the MPs from the Western Province. He shouldn’t! So, we disagree with what he’s suggesting,” Mr Munshya continued as he accused the Chitimukulu of bringing confusion into the Bill 10 debate by adding such a proposal even when there already existed a House of Chiefs in the country.

He wondered why Henry Kanyanta Sosala would be so bent on the creation of the council of Paramount Chiefs. However, Munshya warns that Kanyanta-Manga II’s suggestion may have nothing to do with wanting a special status for the Litunga but that he is manoeuvring to acquire for himself a higher constitutional status that Chitimukulu has never had in the Zambian history. He accuses the chief of wanting to do so using the ‘back door’, the Lozi people and Barotseland.

Mr Munshya said this was not only unbelievable but also unjustifiable that Chitmukulu of the Bemba would blackmail the Barotse UPND MPs in such a manner on the pretext that the MPs would be doing a royal service to their King in so doing!

“Now, Litunga has some justifiable reason for them to claim some special status for Barotseland, and I agree with them. I think Barotseland should have some special constitutional status within a united republic of Zambia because that is what should have happened in 1963 or 1964 when we were negotiating our independence. Nomba ifi ba leta ba Chitimukulu mulomo. Kanabesa, Mulomo! [But the Chitimukulu’s suggestion is confusion. Total confusion, Your Highness!]" Scoffed Munshya as he branded the Chitimukulu’s attempted blackmail on the west MPs nonsensical!

A fourteen minutes and twenty-seven seconds (00:14:27) long video excerpt of Mr Munshya's discourse on Barotseland streamed via his Social media Facebook page last night in reaction to His Royal Highness Henry Kanyanta Sosala's challenge to the Barotse UPND members of the Zambian Parliament to obey their King on Bill 10 is here below reproduced.

VIDEO: Elias Munshya Response to Henry Kanyanta Sosala

VIDEO LANGUAGE: English/Ushi

VIDEO LENGTH: 00:14:27

VIDEO SIZE: 179 MB VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mpZlguZkKk

DISCLAIMER: Barotseland Post does not own the copyright to this Video. Here published under International Fair Use Laws. All rights reserved and credit on all Copyrighted material goes to their respective owners - https://www.facebook.com/pg/munshyaelias

  • Social network:

Leve Your Comment

You are free to comment here below in accordance to our Comments Policy here http://barotselandpost.com/comments-policy

Once you have posted your comment, rest assured that it will be published, even if you don’t see it immediately, as the Comments Cache system needs to refresh and reload before your comment could become visible.

Thank you for your continued interest in our stories!

 

 

The Barotseland Post, also known as The Barotsepost, is an online media platform, for now, that is dedicated to reporting stories and news around Barotseland and beyond, giving exclusive coverage and access to the people and the nation of Barotseland to fully express themselves in their aspirations for self- determination.